The Tattooist of Auschwitz

The tattooist of Auschwitz is the story of Lale as he told it to the author, Heather Morris. The book is very well written and so tense that at times I’m afraid to breathe. It’s hard to put down and reads pretty quickly, but not quick enough to be able to finish it without breathing.
The people in the book are all very human. Even the SS officers have their weaknesses.

Lale is a survivor, he does what he needs to do to have the best possible chance to survive the atrocities of Auschwitz. He’s careful not to hurt other prisoners, but he will not pass on an opportunity to get more food or clothes or protection for himself and his friends. You could argue that by tattooing the numbers on each new prisoner who enters either Auschwitz or Birkenau he hurts them by definition. But he figures that if he doesn’t do it someone else will and he’s probably right about that. The situation is a clear example of how hard it is to decide where you stand and how you will behave in a war. I don’t think you can know this if you haven’t been in a life or death situation. And I can imagine your decisions and behavior will change if the life or death situation lasts 3 years.

Lale falls in love with Gita in the camp. Their love lifts their spirits and the spirits of those around them. Their love is heartbreaking and empowering at the same time. It must have been very strong to be more important and more pronounced than their hunger and their fears. They take significant risks for each other. It also makes the story more bearable for the reader as it provides a glimmer of hope and occasionally even happiness.

Despite the love between Lale and Gita it’s a hard book to read. It would be easy to think this won’t happen anymore. That we won’t let one group of humans slaughter another group of humans based on one or more almost random criteria. But we know this is not true. Myanmar has rejected the citizenship of Rohingya Muslims. Myanmar security forces burn down Rohingya villages, murdering and raping the people.
In China at least 1.5 million Uyghur Muslims are being detained and tortured. Their children are often taken away from them and put into non-Uyghur families. We can pretend that ethnic cleansing is a thing from the past but its not.

Humans can be terrible people. And if we feel being terrible will allow us to be part of a tribe we would like to belong to we find it very hard not to be terrible. You don’t have to go to China or Myanmar to see this in action. I’m sure there is a social media pile-on happening as you read this. Someone who presumably said something someone didn’t like or did something they don’t understand will receive a terrifying amount of hate and threats from people they don’t know. No questions asked.

Selfishness has reached peak levels. If you are wealthy you don’t need a community to survive and many feel that they have to protect what they’ve got. Instead of helping those less fortunate than they are they fight to minimize taxes. They keep people who are in any way different at as much distance as possible. If they might get too close then perhaps bullying and threatening will scare them off. If people ask for help they are sent away, preferably to a place more horrible than the situation they originally fled.

Why do we do this to each other? Why not, if you have been lucky enough in life to have everything, share some of what you have with someone less lucky. Why not live and let live, even if people want to lead a different life than you do? It has been proven over and over again that material wealth doesn’t bring happiness (as long as you have enough to pay for all basic necessities). Helping others and bringing happiness to others is much more likely to bring happiness to you than money or possessions are. Maybe we can all just put this to the test. Who knows how much good it will do to us and the world around us.

Be kind to others, respect their opinions and preferred way of life, help people in need. Next time you feel outraged because someone is different, or doesn’t like something you like or likes something you don’t like try to take a deep breath and think about why this makes the other person a terrible person. What is it that upsets you? Can you try and put yourself in their shoes and empathize with them?

The story of the tattooist of Auschwitz is a powerful one, but it did nothing to improve my faith in humankind. This is exactly why the book is a must-read. We need to be aware of how easily we can be corrupted, so we can be vigilant.
When you finish the book you will be rewarded with the story about how the book was written, which is almost as good as the book itself and moving in its own regards.

2 thoughts on “The Tattooist of Auschwitz

  1. Margie

    Excellent review on this book and your introspection on humanity touched me and I so agree with you!
    It;s true , humans can be terrible people!

    I am an avid reader and will be getting this book soon!

    Thanks for the review!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

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